Forget 3DTVs: MIT Group Working to Bring Holographs to Your Living Room

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One of the breakthroughs of the lab's work, which will be published in this week's issue of the journal Nature, is that the chip is able to transmit information about ten times more quickly than other holographic displays. "We've got 50 gigapixels per second," says Bove. "If you're watching an HDTV at 1080p resolution, that's about 100 megapixels per second. It's like 500 HDTVs all on one little chip."

A higher-resolution display is easy on the eyes but it often isn't easy on the wallet. Even some labs have trouble affording the equipment to do better holography research. But Bove adds that not only is the chip faster at transmitting information, but also costs much less.

"It only costs tens of dollars for the chip itself," he says. Even with all the specialized equipment, it only costs a few hundred dollars. He adds that everything the display uses "were all parts off of the shelf."

Compared to the $20,000 LCD or MEMS display which are normally used for holographic video, the new chip is a bargain. Peyghambarian sees Bove's cost-cutting research as a big step forward for holography. "A lot more people can get their hands on it," he says.

As for when we'll see Bove's work incorporated into new TVs, it may still be several years until the concept is perfected. The lab is also looking into how exactly to incorporate their chips into computer monitors and larger projectors.

However, Peyghambarian is optimistic and says that in time, "We should get large enough displays that will look like what we see outside our windows."

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