Suspect Allegedly Caught Coaching How to Fake Depression

VIDEO: Hundreds of first responders may end up being prosecuted for faking illnesses to receive disability.
Share
Copy

Court documents released today include a transcript of a suspect in an alleged multi-million dollar fraud coaching a New York City employee on how to fake depression and anxiety.

The call allegedly recorded Joseph Esposito, 70, advising the person to "pretend" to have "panic attacks."

He also "coaches" the employee on how to behave when faced with a medical panel considering the application for disability benefits:

"Okay. When you get there, usually the first question they ask you is "How did you get here?" You're gonna say "My sister drove me." The next question they generally ask is "Who does the cooking, cleaning, shopping in your house?" You're gonna say "My mother" and your sister. They, they drove [U/I] for you. When you get to see the doctor, he's gonna ask you questions. He's not trying to trick you. He, uh, they ask these questions, different variations for everybody. They just want to see if you can concentrate. They'll say to you, "But what do you do with yourself all day? How do you spend your day?" You're gonna tell 'em "I don't sleep well at night. I'm up three, four times. Usually, I, I nap on and off during the day. I put the television on, you know, I keep changing channels 'cause I, I can't concentrate on the television. Just, just to hear a voice in the house." And they're liable to say, "From the word—spell the word "world," so you go "W-R-L-D." Then they're gonna say "Spell it backwards." You think about it, and you can't spell it backwards. Then they're liable to say "From a hundred, subtract seven." You know, a hundred, ninety-three, and then you're trying to concentrate, and make it to eighty-six or eighty-five, you know. You're not too sure. Then they might tell you, uh—"I'm going to tell you three things to remember. A spoon, a fork, and a dish," and they're going to ask you later on in the conversation to remember them. You remember one of them. No jewelry, no cellphone – uh, when you're talking to the guy, don't look directly at him. You know, put your head down now and then, don't answer right away. You know, pause for a second. You're just trying to show that, you know, you're depressed. You, you can't, you, you don't have any desire for anything, and if can, you pretend you have panic attacks?

Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...