Bears' QB call wasn't a toss-up

"I have no concerns," he said. "I expect he'll go out and play effectively and efficiently. I'm not going there with any reservation that he'll do anything else."

As for Cutler's future with the team, which involves money in his bank account -- well, Cutler did hear about general manager Phil Emery's reluctance to use the franchise tag next year.

"I know Phil has a plan," Cutler said. "You guys might not know Phil's plan, but he has a plan."

With three games left and the 7-6 Bears' playoff hopes essentially requiring them to run the table and hope Detroit -- which hasn't won two in a row in a month -- loses at least one game, there is no time for Cutler to get into the groove.

"I don't think we have a lot of room for me to be rusty out there," he said.

Is he worried about these last three games affecting his next contract offer? Or even his status with the team?

"I can't worry about it," he said. "We're trying to win football games. Whatever it takes to win that game, that's my mindset. It'll take care of itself. It always does."

Typically, starts against the Cleveland Browns aren't defined as important.

Easy, perhaps. Worry-free, sometimes. But career-defining? Rarely.

Still, there hasn't been a Bears game with this much riding on it in years.

With the playoffs on the line, it's commensurate in importance with that train wreck against Green Bay in the NFC Championship Game that unfairly poisoned Cutler's national reputation for years.

And if the Bears win Sunday at Cleveland, then his next start in Philadelphia is his biggest. And if the Bears somehow slow down the Eagles' offense and Cutler plays well enough for the Bears to win two in a row, then the season finale against Green Bay is Cutler's next biggest game of his life.

This is why we watch, right? Well, that and the fantasy leagues. I guess it's time for me to bench McCown.

Because he couldn't finish his past two games, and because he's been out a month, it's easy to forget that Cutler was playing pretty well this season.

In Cutler's last three games before the groin injury, suffered Oct. 20 against the Redskins, he threw for 937 yards, 6 touchdowns and 3 interceptions. All three picks came in the same game, a loss at Detroit on Sept. 29.

In those three games, he completed 57.4 percent of his passes (Detroit), 66.7 percent (New York) and 72.7 (New Orleans).

Then he started two and finished none with a torn groin and a high ankle sprain, respectively. That led to McCown's ascendance.

McCown has thrown for 1,809 yards, 13 touchdowns and just one interception while subbing for Cutler this season. He accounted for five touchdowns in the 45-28 win over Dallas. Cutler is one of his biggest fans.

"He's played well, he's played really well," Cutler said. "I'm happy for him. If there's anybody who deserves it, it's him."

The 34-year-old McCown, out of football just last year, has all but guaranteed himself a couple million dollars in future contracts.

And Cutler, looking to make tens of millions in guaranteed money, comes back to a streaking offense and an injury-ravaged defense. The Bears are totally reliant on the offense to not only show up, but dominate. While McCown was very good, the Bears' offense hasn't been overpowering, especially in the red zone.

Cutler should be the missing piece of the puzzle. He needs to be efficient and deadly from the opening series.

"There's pressure to make the playoffs every game," he said. "This is my eighth year. I've been down this road before."

That's kind of what we're afraid of.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine